New Zealand


Introduction

New Zealand is a country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean consisting of 2 main islands, both marked by volcanoes and glaciation. Capital Wellington, on the North Island, is home to Te Papa Tongarewa, the expansive national museum. Wellington’s dramatic Mt. Victoria, along with the South Island’s Fiordland and Southern Lakes, stood in for mythical Middle Earth in Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” films.
Population: 4.471 million (2013) World Bank
Currency: New Zealand dollar

Population

New Zealand is a country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean consisting of 2 main islands, both marked by volcanoes and glaciation. Capital Wellington, on the North Island, is home to Te Papa Tongarewa, the expansive national museum. Wellington’s dramatic Mt. Victoria, along with the South Island’s Fiordland and Southern Lakes, stood in for mythical Middle Earth in Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” films.
Related statistics
GDP per capita
41,555.83 USD ?(2013)
Gross domestic product
185.8 billion USD ?(2013)
Life expectancy
81.16 years ?(2012)

Geography

The country is the size of Colorado. New Zealand’s two main components are the North Island and the South Island, separated by Cook Strait. The North Island (44,281 sq mi; 115,777 sq km) is 515 mi (829 km) long and volcanic in its south-central part.

History

The history of New Zealand dates back at least 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct M?ori culture centred on kinship links and land. The first European explorer to sight New Zealand was Abel Janszoon Tasman on 13 December 1642.

Demography

New Zealand is a country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean consisting of 2 main islands, both marked by volcanoes and glaciation. Capital Wellington, on the North Island, is home to Te Papa Tongarewa, the expansive national museum. Wellington’s dramatic Mt. Victoria, along with the South Island’s Fiordland and Southern Lakes, stood in for mythical Middle Earth in Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” films.
Population: 4.471 million (2013) World Bank
Life expectancy: 81.16 years (2012) World Bank
Fertility rate: 2.05 births per woman (2012) World Bank
Population growth rate: 0.8% annual change (2013) World Bank
GNI per capita: 30,750 PPP dollars (2012) World Bank
Official languages: English, M?ori, New Zealand Sign Language
Population 22,507,617 (July 2014 est.)
Age structure 0-14 years: 18% (male 2,075,316/female 1,969,645)
15-24 years: 13.3% (male 1,534,947/female 1,457,250)
25-54 years: 41.8% (male 4,783,473/female 4,626,603)
55-64 years: 11.8% (male 1,321,246/female 1,341,329)
65 years and over: 15.1% (male 1,569,197/female 1,828,611) (2014 est.)
Dependency ratios total dependency ratio: 51 %
youth dependency ratio: 28.9 %
elderly dependency ratio: 22.1 %
potential support ratio: 4.5 (2014 est.)
Median age total: 38.3 years
male: 37.5 years
female: 39 years (2014 est.)
Population growth rate 1.09% (2014 est.)
Birth rate 12.19 births/1,000 population (2014 est.)
Death rate 7.07 deaths/1,000 population (2014 est.)
Net migration rate 5.74 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2014 est.)
Urbanization urban population: 89.2% of total population (2011)
rate of urbanization: 1.49% annual rate of change (2010-15 est.)
Major cities – population Sydney 4.543 million; Melbourne 3.961 million; Brisbane 2.039 million; Perth 1.649 million; Adelaide 1.198 million; CANBERRA (capital) 399,000 (2011)
Sex ratio at birth: 1.06 male(s)/female
0-14 years: 1.05 male(s)/female
15-24 years: 1.05 male(s)/female
25-54 years: 1.03 male(s)/female
55-64 years: 1.01 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.85 male(s)/female
total population: 1.01 male(s)/female (2014 est.)
Mother’s mean age at first birth 30.5 (2006 est.)
Infant mortality rate total: 4.43 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 4.74 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 4.1 deaths/1,000 live births (2014 est.)
Life expectancy at birth total population: 82.07 years
male: 79.63 years
female: 84.64 years (2014 est.)
Total fertility rate 1.77 children born/woman (2014 est.)
Contraceptive prevalence rate 72.3%
note: percent of women aged 18-44 (2005)
HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate 0.1% (2009 est.)
HIV/AIDS – people living with HIV/AIDS 20,000 (2009 est.)
HIV/AIDS – deaths fewer than 100 (2009 est.)
Drinking water source improved: 
urban: 100% of population
rural: 100% of population
total: 100% of population
unimproved:
urban: 0% of population
rural: 0% of population
total: 0% of population (2012 est.)
Sanitation facility access improved: 
urban: 100% of population
rural: 100% of population
total: 100% of population
unimproved:
urban: 0% of population
rural: 0% of population
total: 0% of population (2012 est.)
Nationality noun: Australian(s)
adjective: Australian
Ethnic groups white 92%, Asian 7%, aboriginal and other 1%
Religions Protestant 28.8% (Anglican 17.1%, Uniting Church 5.0%, Presbyterian and Reformed 2.8%, Baptist, 1.6%, Lutheran 1.2%, Pentecostal 1.1%), Catholic 25.3%, Eastern Orthodox 2.6%, other Christian 4.5%, Buddhist 2.5%, Muslim 2.2%, Hindu 1.3%, other 8.4%, unspecified 2.2%, none 22.3%
note: percentages add up to more than 100% due to rounding (2006 est.)
Languages English 76.8%, Mandarin 1.6%, Italian 1.4%, Arabic 1.3%, Greek 1.2%, Cantonese 1.2%, Vietnamese 1.1%, other 10.4%, unspecified 5% (2011 est.)
Literacy definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 99%
male: 99%
female: 99% (2003 est.)
School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education) total: 20 years
male: 19 years
female: 20 years (2011)
Education expenditures 5.6% of GDP (2010)
Maternal mortality rate 7 deaths/100,000 live births (2010)
Children under the age of 5 years underweight 0.2% (2007)
Health expenditures 9% of GDP (2011)
Physicians density 3.85 physicians/1,000 population (2010)
Hospital bed density 3.9 beds/1,000 population (2010)

Study Benefits

Students in New Zealand are supported to solve problems, process information, work with others, create and innovate. Whichever level you’re studying at, New Zealand can give you a high-quality education that will enable you to achieve your goals.

Tertiary education

Ages 18+

New Zealand has eight state-funded universities, 16 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) and about 550 Private Training Establishments (PTEs), which include English language schools.

Choose the type of institution that’s best for your career path:

  • Universities offer higher degree-level education. Programmes are research-led and generally academic rather than vocational. In the 2015/16 QS World University Rankings, all eight of New Zealand’s universities were in the top 100 in at least one subject.
  • ITPs and a few larger PTEs offer vocational degree-level education.
  • PTEs tend to offer specific vocational programmes, mainly at certificate and diploma level.

Vocational Training Institution  Universities  Institutes of Technology Study English 

Secondary school

Ages 13-18 (Years 9-13)

New Zealand has three types of school:

  • state schools, where 85% of Kiwi children go
  • state-integrated schools, which may be run by a religious faith or use specialist teaching methods
  • private schools.

Students at secondary schools – also known as high schools or colleges – work towards the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA). Secondary schools also offer some vocational subjects, such as tourism and computing.

Some schools also offer Cambridge International Examinations and International Baccalaureate programmes.

How NCEA works

www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/qualifications/ncea/understanding-ncea/how-ncea-works/

Schools 

Intermediate school

Ages 11-12 (Years 7-8)

Intermediate schools are a bridge between primary school and secondary school.

Primary education starts at Year 1 and continues through to Year 8. Years 7 and 8 are offered either at a primary school or at a separate intermediate school.

Schools 

Primary school

Ages 5-10 (Years 1-6)

Primary school students study subjects guided by New Zealand National Curriculum: English, the arts, health and physical education, languages, mathematics and statistics, science, social sciences and technology.

Students’ abilities in reading, writing and maths are regularly assessed against expectations for their age level, as set out by New Zealand’s National Standards.

National Standards

nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/National-Standards

Schools 

Early childhood

Ages 0-5

Early childhood education provides education and care for children before they are old enough to go to school.

New Zealand has more than 4000 licensed early childhood education services available, including kindergartens, childcare centres, play centres, home-based care and playgroups.

VISA and Immigration

About this visaFee Paying Student Visa

If you’re from overseas, you can apply for a visa to study full-time in New Zealand. You’ll need to pay the full cost of your courses and enrol with an approved education provider. While you’re here, you can enjoy New Zealand’s high-quality teaching standards and gain internationally recognised qualifications.

Overview

Up to 4 years


ALL VISA CONDITIONS

With this visa you can

  • Study full-time at the course stated on your visa – this includes schools, tertiary (study after secondary school) and English language study.
  • Work part-time up to 20 hours a week while studying or full-time in the holidays, depending on your visa conditions.
  • Live by yourself above a certain age, otherwise you’ll need to come with your parent or legal guardian.

Things to note

  • You can apply for this visa if you’re a distance learning or correspondence student and you need to visit your New Zealand education provider for any reason to do with your education, eg to do practical study or sit exams.
  • If you want to bring your partner or children with you, they can apply for visas based on their relationship to you.
  • Your Student Visa is normally for the same length of time as the study you’ve paid for.

The application process

STAGE 1

1Gather your documents

2Submit your application

3Wait for a decision

FAQ

Why do you want to study in New Zealand?
New Zealand also has an international reputation as a provider of quality education. It offers a safe learning environment which provides excellent study opportunities and support services for international students.
What is a student visa?
Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence. 
How many bands are required for New Zealand?
Required Tests.
New Zealand colleges and universities accept either TOEFL or IELTS scores as proof of English proficiency. Pre-Degree-Diploma & Undergraduate Degree.
IELTS (Academic) score – Overall score of 6.0 with no band less than 5.5 or overall5.5 with no band less than 5.0.
How much does it cost to study in New Zealand?
Funding your study. While New Zealand is a great place to study as an international student, it does have one downside – tuition costs. Fees for arts or social sciences range from NZ$20,000 (£9,680) a year. Courses in science and engineering can cost from NZ$25,000 (£12,000) per year.

New zealand Study Options

Avonmore Tertiary Institute

Asia pacific international institute